New Hampshire’s Governor Chooses Placating the Leftist-Elite Over Facts

Governor Chris Sununu, in response to President Trump’s impromptu news conference at Trump Tower, which was supposed to be about infrastructure, but quickly became all about Charlottesville:

Sununu’s tweet essentially parrots the elite-Left’s Charlottesville narrative.

In a nutshell, that narrative is that ALL the “counter-protesters,” including Antifa, were there to oppose the “racism and hatred” of the neo-Nazis, white-supremacists and anti-semitics (from here on, white-supremacists for short); that Trump was engaging in “moral equivalency” when he said “many sides” shared blame for the violence in Charlottesville; and that this “moral equivalency” emboldens white-supremacists.  And explicitly in some cases, but more often by insinuation, that Trump engages in this “moral equivalency” because he is sympathetic to white-supremacists and/or does not want to alienate his base, a sizable number of whom are white-supremacistss.

There is so much wrong with this narrative that it is hard to know where to begin.

To begin with, Trump did not say that there was a moral equivalency between the white-supremacists and all the counter-protesters when he blamed “many sides” for the violence in Charlottesville.  He was referring to violent counter-protesters, such as Antifa.  From Daniel Payne in the Federalist:

Trump appears to separate the generalized violence of that Saturday afternoon from the vehicular homicide a white nationalist perpetrated on Charlottesville’s mall near the end of the whole affair. In the press conference, Trump stated in no uncertain terms: “The driver of the car is a murderer. What he did was a horrible, inexcusable thing.”

It is, rather, the periodic violence that occurred throughout Charlottesville’s downtown area to which Trump was apparently referring. And he’s right: both sides committed violence on that day.

There were numerous eyewitness accounts of Antifa engaging in violence in Charlottesville.  From a New York Times reporter who was present:

In other words, to the extent that Trump was drawing a moral equivalency it was between the white-supremacists and Antifa.

Nor in the interest of completeness -although I do not think that Sununu’s tweet repeated this particular calumny- did Trump say that some white-supremacists were “good people.”  From David Limbaugh:

… When you cut through all the clutter and noise, it seems that Trump’s main sin was saying that both sides were at fault and that there were good people on both sides of the protest.

If I thought that by this Trump meant that there are good people among neo-Nazis and white supremacists, I would join in the strong criticism. And I admit he could have been more artful. …

But I don’t believe for a second that Trump is a racist or that he approves of white supremacy, neo-Nazism, anti-Semitism or any other form of racism or bigotry. I think that what he meant was that there are good people among those defending the monuments. And it appears that most Americans agree with that, despite the media’s conscious effort to suggest otherwise. Recent polls show that some 62 percent of Americans support preserving the monuments as historic symbols, and 67 percent of Republicans approve of Trump’s statement on Charlottesville. Do any of you really want to claim that 62 percent of Americans or 67 percent of Republicans are bigots?

Next point.  There clearly is a degree of moral equivalency between the white-supremacists and Antifa.  A mark of fascism is limiting speech by any means, including violence and Antifa regularly employs mob-violence to shut down any -not just white-supremacist- speech that it does not agree with.  From Guy Benson at Townhall:

A national discussion about political violence must include the obviously relevant fascistic thuggery of Antifa Leftists. … Antifa’s brutality and violence hasn’t merely been limited to the horrible spectacle in Virginia.  They’ve assaulted Trump supporters at political events, they’ve rioted to prevent others’ exercise of free speech rights, and they’ve used threats and intimidation to cancel civic events in which Republicans planned to participate.

Yet the elite-Left and Sununu are adamant that there is no equivalency at all.  That one side wears a black hat and the other white hat.  The reality is nothing like that.

Stated somewhat differently, just because someone fights Nazis does not make that person a good person.  Stalin fought the Nazis.  Stalin also was a mass-murderer who killed millions of his own people and oppressed hundreds of millions.  Are we supposed to overlook that Stalin was a mass-murderer because he fought the Nazis?  Nor should we overlook that Antifa is composed of anarchists who use violence to suppress any speech they disagree with because Antifa fought white-supremacists in Charlotte.  Yet that is exactly what the elite-Left’s Charlottesville narrative and Sununu’s tweet does.

Final point.  If you say Trump is emboldening white supremacists, then you must say that the elite-Left and Sununu are emboldening Antifa and groups like Antifa.  From David Harsanyi at the Federalist:

None of the president’s shortcomings, however, change reality. If you believe his comments emboldened white supremacists, your insistence that leftist violence doesn’t exist does the same for other groups — who, while perhaps not always as ugly, are far more prevalent.

Quick Takeaways from the Special Election in State Senate District 16

Unofficial results have Democrat Kevin Cavanaugh defeating Republican David Boutin by a very comfortable margin of 55% to 45% in the Special Election for State Senate District 16.

The result should serve as a wake-up call to the NH GOP because Boutin held the seat from 2010 to 2016 and Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton essentially battled to a draw in 2016, with Clinton eking out a 15,150 to 15,040 win.

The difference in performance between Trump and Boutin is even more striking because Trump had to contend with hordes of out-of-State college students from Southern New Hampshire University and Saint Anselm voting in his election, while Boutin had the benefit of many of these students being home for summer break.

So why did Boutin so underperform Trump? Continue reading

Chris Sununu Sounds Like and Sides With the Democrats on Obamacare

Earlier this week Governor Chris Sununu released a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell regarding the Senate GOP’s health-care legislation, the Better Care Reconciliation Act, advising that, “the current version of the BCRA goes beyond addressing Obamacare’s flaws. This is not an approach I can support, and I am opposed to the BCRA as currently written.

But when one reads Sununu’s letter it quickly becomes clear that Sununu’s actual problem with the BCRA is that it does not spend as much on Medicaid as Obamacare: Continue reading

Chris Sununu Has His Harriet Miers Moment

Remember Harriet Miers?  She was President George W. Bush’s choice to fill the United States Supreme Court vacancy left by Sandra Day O’Connor’s retirement.  Here’s what the late Judge Robert Bork had to say about Miers back in 2005:

TUCKER CARLSON, MSNBC HOST: Are you impressed by the president’s choice of Harriet Miers?

JUDGE ROBERT BORK, FORMER SUPREME COURT NOMINEE: Not a bit.  I think it’s a disaster on every level.

CARLSON: Why?  Explain the levels on which it’s a disaster.

BORK: Well, the first one is, that this is a woman who’s undoubtedly as wonderful a person as they say she is, but so far as anyone can tell she has no experience with constitutional law whatever.  Now it’s a little late to develop a constitutional philosophy or begin to work it out when you’re on the court already.  So that—I’m afraid she’s likely to be influenced by factors, such as personal sympathies and so forth, that she shouldn’t be influenced by.  I don’t expect that she can be, as the president says, a great justice.

But the other level is more worrisome, in  a way:  it’s kind of a slap in the face to the conservatives who’ve been building up a conservative legal movement for the last 20 years.  There’s all kinds of people, now, on the federal bench and some in the law schools who have worked out consistent philosophies of sticking with the original principles of the Constitution.  And all of those people have been overlooked. …

The same concerns raised by Bork apply to Governor Chris Sununu’s nomination of “Bobbie” Hantz Marconi to the New Hampshire Supreme Court. Continue reading

Serious Questions Raised by Sununu’s Nomination of Arlinghaus

Chris Sununu has nominated long-time FOS, Friend-of-Sununus, Charlie Arlinghaus to be the Commissioner of the Department of Administrative Services:

“New Hampshire will be in good hands with Charlie Arlinghaus leading the Department of Administrative Services,” Sununu said in a statement. “Charlie has a deep knowledge and understanding of the budget and state agencies, and I look forward to nominating him at tomorrow’s Council meeting.”

This raises some serious questions. Continue reading

#FAKENEWS – NHPR’s “Coverage” of Ray Buckley’s Frivolous Ethics Complaint Against Sununu

I posted about Ray Buckley’s utterly frivolous “ethics complaint” against Governor Sununu here.

That post, in part, covered how hack-extrodinaire John DiStaso -Ray Buckley’s go-to guy to get his message out per Steve Vaillancourt- wrote a follow-up to his original story about Ray Buckley’s nothing-burger of an ethics complaint when there was nothing to follow up on.

Casey McDermott of New Hampshire Public Radio pulled a DiStaso yesterday, reporting that there was nothing new to report: Continue reading

A Head-Scratcher from Sununu

I agree with Governor Sunna’s decision not to renominate Tom Raffio to the State Board of Education.  Raffio would continue the status quo, not #DrainTheSwamp.

But Drew Cline to replace him?  Cline is a smart guy.  But I don’t know of any experience or interest in education.  Google Drew Cline and education and nothing about education comes up except his nomination.  His website indicates that he has spent his entire career in journalism.

Google Rich Girard and education, and it’s a different story: Continue reading

On School Choice, Sununu Supports the #VolinskyAgenda

Governor Sununu recently had this to say about a prominent school-choice bill, SB 193:

I think when it comes to using state money for schools, and I think a lot of people know I’m a big believer in school choice, that whatever we do, we have to make sure we’re not harming public schools.

We’re not just removing funds out of those schools and we understand that as we move money around, what those pros and cons might be.

I do have concerns when you start using state funds, whether it be a voucher program, or all the different terms that you want to put for it, to schools of a non-public nature.

Whatever we do, we have to take things step wise. I think that’s the most important thing. You don’t want to jump into everything all at once.

One of the things I like and that I’ve seen and that I’ve encouraged on the table are opening it up just within a program that allows flexibility within public schools, whether it just be for certain grades or maybe for entire districts if the districts were small enough or compact enough.

I think the point is that you don’t want to jump in too big too fast. You have to understand what the repercussions to the public school systems might be and make sure that you’re doing it step wise so that you understand the pros, cons, negative effects, and unintended consequences of any program you put forward in the state.

Stated considerably more succinctly, Sununu (a) believes reducing funding for public schools in order to fund school-choice may “harm[] public schools,” and (b) he wants to limit, at least initially, school choice to choice among public schools. Continue reading

What The NH House Freedom Caucus Must Do Next On The Budget

This is a companion piece to What Governor Sununu Must Do Next On The Budget, which I posted yesterday.  As I did with the prior post, I will begin with the NH House Freedom Caucus’ statement on the House’s failure to pass a budget: Continue reading