The #VolinskyConstitution

UPDATE June 24, 2017:  Appears I was wrong and Bradley was right.  #VolinskyAgenda & fellow hard-leftist Dan Feltes (Communist – Concord) lobbied Democrat representatives to vote against full-day kindergarten.

As usual, I find myself in disagreement with State Senator Jeb Bradley (RINO – Wolfeboro).  More specifically, I think Bradley’s observation that Executive Councilor Andru Volinsky (Communist – Concord) is trying to create political-cover for Democrats in the New Hampshire House and Senate to vote against increased spending on kindergarten is wrong.

I think Volinsky believes that he can bluff the Legislature into increasing spending on kindergarten, failing which some Democrat lawyer will file a lawsuit along the lines Volinsky has sketched and that New Hampshire’s Democrat-appointed judiciary will expand the Claremont rulings to make “fully-funded, full-day kindergarten” a “constitutional right.” Continue reading

The #VolinskyAgenda – Yogurtnomics

I previously posted about the #VolinskyAgenda here, in response to this tweet from Volinsky:

Volinsky is out with an op-ed about how he would grow the New Hampshire economy.

But just as the #VoliskyAgenda described in Volinsky’s tweet really involves empowering government at the expense of parents, healthcare consumers, and private business, so too Volinsky’s economic agenda is all about increasing the size and scope of government. Continue reading

On School Choice, Sununu Supports the #VolinskyAgenda

Governor Sununu recently had this to say about a prominent school-choice bill, SB 193:

I think when it comes to using state money for schools, and I think a lot of people know I’m a big believer in school choice, that whatever we do, we have to make sure we’re not harming public schools.

We’re not just removing funds out of those schools and we understand that as we move money around, what those pros and cons might be.

I do have concerns when you start using state funds, whether it be a voucher program, or all the different terms that you want to put for it, to schools of a non-public nature.

Whatever we do, we have to take things step wise. I think that’s the most important thing. You don’t want to jump into everything all at once.

One of the things I like and that I’ve seen and that I’ve encouraged on the table are opening it up just within a program that allows flexibility within public schools, whether it just be for certain grades or maybe for entire districts if the districts were small enough or compact enough.

I think the point is that you don’t want to jump in too big too fast. You have to understand what the repercussions to the public school systems might be and make sure that you’re doing it step wise so that you understand the pros, cons, negative effects, and unintended consequences of any program you put forward in the state.

Stated considerably more succinctly, Sununu (a) believes reducing funding for public schools in order to fund school-choice may “harm[] public schools,” and (b) he wants to limit, at least initially, school choice to choice among public schools. Continue reading

The #VolinskyAgenda

TRANSLATION:

“strong pub schools” – block school choice, so middle-class and poor parents cannot pick the schools their children attend the way rich parents, like Andru Volinsky, can and do.  Forcing middle-class and poor parents into public schools facilitates Democrats inculcating their left-wing values into children, and thereby creates generation after generation of compliant Democrat voters who think, talk and act the way Democrats think they should.  Especially cannot allow children to attend religious schools because abortion must never be seen as the taking of an innocent human life.

“basic healthcare=human rt.” – heavy and ubiquitous government control over healthcare (including de facto rationing), and higher taxes. Continue reading